New British Indoor Freediving records

From Sport Diver:

Three British freediving athletes set incredible new records at the UK Indoor Nationals last weekend on 10-11 March; Georgina Miller pushed her own static record even further for the third time with six minutes 20 seconds; John Moorcroft took Chris Crawshaw’s brand-new record with a Dynamic No Fins (DNF) swim of 153 metres; and to top off the excitement Chris reclaimed his record within the hour with an incredible DNF swim of 163 metres.

Georgina, or George as she is known, has been training and competing for a few years now, but really found her confidence in 2009, when she made her first mark on the British records, with a static performance of five minutes 46 seconds. Since then she has gone from strength to strength, her second record coming just three months later when she became the first woman to break the magical six-minute mark with a new records of 6:04. She knocked that record with 6:11 and now tops that with 6:20! George has represented the UK at all recent World Championships and also serves on the British Freediving Association.
She said: “I had a great weekend getting a national record in the static of 6:20 and a first overall for the ladies. I would like to thank Daan Verhoeven, who was a fantastic coach and has put lots of work into helping me, particularly in static. Thanks also to Orca for the wonderful sponsorship of the comp with a Breathe suit”.
John Moorcroft is one of British freediving’s most-consistent and persistent athletes and not only did he make a stunning performance with his second British record of 153 metres DNF (first in 2000 STA 5:05) at this year’s Indoor Nationals, he was also honoured with an Outstanding Achievement Award by the BFA for a decade of service to the freediving community. John’s commitment to competitive freediving goes back to 2000, when he competed in the third-ever AIDA World Championships in Ibiza. This weekend he not only took second place in DNF, but also came third overall in the men’s competition. He is now in training for the UK Depth Nationals in Chepstow in May, where he hopes to be in the mid-50s in Constant No Fins (CNF) and mid-60s in Constant Weight (CWT).
John said: “Basically I’m really pleased with my record, even if it only lasted an hour. My training is going well, and thanks go to Steve Millard for his coaching. I started snorkelling at the age of nine, and now at 44 my passion for breathhold diving – depth and spearfishing mainly – is stronger than ever. Thanks to PoloSub (www.polosub.com) for sponsoring me a new suit to keep me warm for my depth training in cold UK quarries over the next few months!”
Chris Crawshaw is still cutting his teeth in freediving compared to John, but he is doing it in style. With two National Records in just two weeks, taking the DNF record from 144 metres to a huge 163 metres, Chris has suddenly become a very compelling prospect for the future of British – and possibly World – freediving. He already has his first Worlds experience under his belt from the 2011 Indoor Championships in Lignano, Italy, and is now setting his sights on even greater things. While he has a long way to go to the current DNF World record of 218m, with progression like this, who knows where he might end up!
Chris said: “Thanks go first and foremost to Steve ‘raising the dead’ Millard because, as anyone who watches the video can see, without his coaching on the side it would probably have been a red card. That’s what it took, though, to put distance on John for whom I have so much respect as a diver and as a friend. I’m currently looking at a move out to New Zealand to train and to continue working as a doctor, but the long-term plan is to leave my job for a year and focus on the depth disciplines, providing I can find support and sponsors. It’s been such an incredible couple of weeks.”
Thanks go to Steve Millard of Apneists UK for organising the event and coaching many of the athletes.

Fo more information: http://www.sportdiver.co.uk/News/Latest-News/New-British-Indoor-Freediving-records

No 9: Dive Gear For Sale

Hi All

I’m sure with great regret Pat Gibbon is having to give up diving because of continuing health issues,
hence the sale of this gear.

Please get in touch with Pat about anything you are interested in.

If you have any problems opening the PDF then let me know and I will send you a second version as just an email.

Regards

Grahame

BSAC News March 16, 2012

BSAC-SE – Sea Survival – Southhampton

Sea Survival:
Southampton on 24 March:

For those who have signed up to this, a reminder….and for those who have not, an opportunity to do so.
The RYA runs a one day Sea Survival course. Speaking to people who have done the course, it is good fun, and you learn things that could save your life. The programme on BBC 2 the other Sunday got me thinking about what happens if you fall in….The 1 day course is run in Southampton on 24 March.
The cost is £60 fotr the day, including certification.
Details about the course are below. Complete the booking form “Sea Survival” on Google Docs, if you want to do the course, or let me know. Payment is due ASAP after booking. Please email me (ross.hanley@nullvirgin.net), or send a message, and I will send the bank account details.

Sea Survival
A one-day course for anyone going to sea, providing an understanding of how to use the safety equipment on board your boat.
A genuine lifesaver
Cruising is one of the safest leisure sporting activities, and 99.9% of those afloat will never use their liferaft. However, if you are part of the unlucky 0.1% your chances of survival will be greatly increased if you understand how to use the equipment and how to help yourself.
It is a well-proven fact that, in the event of an emergency at sea, people with training are more likely to survive.
An important part of the course is a practical session in a swimming pool. Experience first hand the problems of entering an uncooperative liferaft and assisting others while fully kitted out in wet weather gear and a lifejacket.
Course topics include:
• liferafts and the equipment they contain
• survival techniques
• the design of lifejackets
• medical aspects of sea survival
• search and rescue techniques

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